Shadow War

The cloak and dagger war being waged between Israel and Iran is starting to come out of the shadows. Or, at least some aspects of it are.

So far, it seems that Israel is winning in purely covert terms, but it doesn’t look like she’s even close to stopping the Iranian nuclear program. The question on everyone’s mind centers on how long the shadow war will last before it turns into a full-blown shooting war.

Since none of us are privy to the deliberations of the leadership in either Israel or Iran, it’s really hard to know. If the leaked information coming out of both Washington and Jerusalem are any guide, the covert phase of this conflict will be ending soon.

We’ll see.

But, if I had my druthers, I’d like to see this shadow war continue indefinitely.


Analysis: Israeli-Iranian war now out of shadows

By YAAKOV KATZ 02/14/2012, Jerusalem Post (and by REUTERS)

The three recent plots are a demonstration of a determined Iranian effort to attack Israel at almost all costs.

If there was any doubt, the capture of two Iranian nationals in Bangkok on Tuesday – just hours after the home they were renting exploded in a work accident – shows that the Israeli-Iranian war has now moved out of the shadows.

Iran is out to strike at Israel and appears to be panicking as it tries. The three recent plots, including the relatively successful bombing in New Delhi on Monday, are a demonstration of a determined Iranian effort to attack Israel at almost all costs.

But there is something to be said about Iran’s and Hezbollah’s failure so far to succeed fully in their attacks.

This could be evidence of what Israeli defense officials have claimed since 2008: that replacing Imad Mughniyeh, the Lebanese group’s military commander and terror mastermind assassinated that year in Damascus, was nearly impossible, and his loss was a huge blow to the terrorist group.

Mughniyeh oversaw Hezbollah’s operations overseas in the 1990s and 2000s and is believed to have orchestrated the 1992 bombing of the Israeli Embassy in Buenos Aires and of the AMIA Jewish community center there two years later.

Read the rest of the article here.